Livestock

Viewing 10 posts - 1 through 10 (of 10 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #7651
    Henry Rogers
    Participant

      Hi,
      Could you provide some detail about what sort of livestock they have? I’m particularly interested in whether or not they keep goats, but also if they have other ruminants. From reading other pages on this website, it seems that using manure fertilizer is widely practiced, but how exactly do they process the manure? I’m also interested in whether they use manure for biofuel. Also, what sort of enclosures do they use for their animals, and who mainly looks after them? How labour-intensive is it to look after the animals, and do the villagers have much knowledge of exporting livestock to the market?
      Many thanks,
      Henry

      #7661
      Sai Rupa Dev
      Keymaster

        Hi Henry,

        Livestock includes: Goats, pigs, poultry, and cattle from what we’ve seen.

        Manure: Manure is typically collected from livestock enclosures and composted to produce organic fertilizer for agricultural crops. Using Manure for biofuel may not be as common due to limited access to biogas systems or alternative energy sources. However, using dried up manure in firewood stoves is observed.

        Livestock management: Livestock in Pu Ngaol village are often kept in simple enclosures made from locally available materials such as bamboo, wood, or wire fencing. The responsibility for caring for livestock is typically shared among family members, with adults and children contributing to feeding, watering, and general animal care. I would say it is a bit labour intensive.Villagers in Pu Ngaol may have some knowledge of livestock marketing, as selling surplus animals can provide additional income for households. The extent of knowledge about exporting livestock to formal markets may vary, and many villagers may rely on local markets or informal networks for selling animals.

        Hope that helps,
        Cheers,
        Sai

        #7676
        Henry Rogers
        Participant

          Hi Sai,
          Thank you for that informative response, I will find that information very useful. Could you by any chance tell me what method they use for manure collection? Do they use some sort of receptacle attached to the animal?
          Also, I’m interested in if they have considered using grazing animals as a means to manage overgrowth, and perhaps turn wild patches of grass into arable land.
          Thanks again,
          Henry

          #7713
          Sai Rupa Dev
          Keymaster

            Hey Henry,

            They pick it up. Manually.

            What kind of grazing animals were you thinking? Cattle nad goats are grazing animals that graze around the village.

            #7717
            Henry Rogers
            Participant

              Hi Sai,
              I am thinking about goats for grazing seeing as they seem to be used in other parts of Cambodia as a relatively easy source of income. I am thinking that along with foraging off of the local flora, goats could also be made to graze on some of the overgrowth around Pu Ngaol to help farmers clear the land. Is this something that they already do, or is it perhaps not very practicable?
              Thanks

              #7721
              Sai Rupa Dev
              Keymaster

                Hey Henry,

                Not a formalised practice, but I think they do this to some extent, meaning who own farm lands as well as cattle and goats. Good idea though. I’d advise you to factor in scale, means of communication (between farm owners and cattle herders), effects of seasons into it.

                Cheers,
                Sai

                #7741
                Henry Rogers
                Participant

                  Hi Sai,
                  Thanks for the advice. Could you give more detail into the state of the overgrowth in Pu Ngaol? Do they tend to clear out smaller, more manageable patches of overgrowth, or do they try to clear quite large areas at a time? Do they always clear the land with the aim to establish farmland? Is it mostly fit and able adults doing the clearing work (I understand they either use machinery or manual labour)?
                  Also, importantly, what kind of flora is typical in overgrown sections?
                  What is the relationship like between herders and farm owners? What is the proportion of farm owners to herders?
                  Thanks again,
                  Henry

                  #7769
                  Jean Aquinde
                  Keymaster

                    Hi Henry,

                    Thanks for taking us through your thought process. I’m backreading your discussion with Sai, and I can tell that you have sufficient information to work on your design. The answer to your recent questions varies from household to household.

                    For the purpose of your design project, I would approach it with a smaller scale in mind and have some design alternatives based on what information you have available. In practice, design proposals are a great way to present your vision to the stakeholders; however, remember that the design process is often iterative, and minor details that may impact your design may only come up during stakeholder consultation.

                    All the best with your project!

                    Regards,
                    Jean

                    • This reply was modified 6 days, 22 hours ago by Jean Aquinde.
                    #7841
                    Henry Rogers
                    Participant

                      Hi Jean,
                      Thanks for your advice, I hadn’t considered those later aspects of the design. I will definitely work on those ideas you gave me.
                      Thanks,
                      Henry

                      #7842
                      Jean Aquinde
                      Keymaster

                        You’re welcome Henry! 🙂

                        Regards,
                        Jean

                      Viewing 10 posts - 1 through 10 (of 10 total)
                      • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.